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Tag: components

Season 01 – Episode 37 – Modular Components, Reassembling the Rig

Modular Components and Rig Assembly

I’ve talked about components being modular before and I’ve shown the I/O process in the past, but this time around we do it for real.

There isn’t anything specific that’s new, but I did kind of like how it went and I would recommend watching it. It will take you through the whole process of componentisation and assembly well enough.

There’s a bit of everything in it, Maya bugs, scripting, tiny amount of nodelling, Q/C, conforming, the actual I/O of the components…
All in all I feel it came out well paced and it covers a good chunk of ground in one hour.

To be a bit more specific: This is where we take all of our components and we push them through the I/O process (to file and from file) both for Q/C (Quality Control) as well as to actually re-assemble a full rig.

In the process I list a couple gotchas with containers, find a non-bug, and we write a trivial renaming script (more for variety than anything). All the work gets done on time, and we fix the last couple dirty bits in our components, which turned out to be bug-free, and only in need of some conforming.

QnA, the last dozen minutes or so, is mostly me rambling about rig standards, instrumenting rigs, and pipelines at scale and not.

As usual the code is available on GitHub in the didactic section but it really isn’t anything much.

Enjoy,

Season 01 – Episode 33 – Mirroring Leg Component

Mirroring Components

This episode we build on the theory and waffling of the previous two and (successfully) get onto Mirroring the Leg Component.

There’s a bit of everything coming up as needed: For the most part it pulls together elements from all over, especially the previous episode, until the leg has a functional handedness switch doing all the expected work.

Over the next few episodes we’ll extend this past the boundaries of the leg, the global and foot, and that should be the end of the rigging part of the season,

Enjoy,

Season 01 – Episode 32 – Maths: Mirroring Transforms, Components: Modularising

Maths: Mirroring Transforms
Components: Modularisation

A little bit of an odd episode as it treats two completely different and unrelated subjects.

In the first half we go over modularising components, gotchas, procedure, some tricks on how to manage it with pure vanilla Maya and so on. Not bad going.

As the next step after that will be mirroring components I thought it would be beneficial to actually explain what reflection (handedness inversion) means in mathematical terms, and show what it looks like with Maya transforms.

The QnA indulges on a scaling related question too in the context of deformation.

It had been a while since we did a math video or a Maya workflow one, so it was kind of cool to get to treat both in one session.

Enjoy,

Season 01 – Chill Session 01 – Clean Up episode 27 scene

Scene Clean Up betrween episodes 27 and 28

Clean Up Work between episodes 27 and 28.

Not much more than that to be said.
It’s the periodic clean up work before sharing a large scene I would normally do off stream, but decided to share this time.

I intentionally refrained from modifying or adding behavior to the components, that’s something I would do in an official stream, but you might still like it for a light listening/watching.

The important bit is the scene, which is now available in the resources page

Enjoy,

Season 01 – Episode 18 – Refactoring Components

Refactoring Components

In this episode we do a pretty extensive refactoring (strict) of the leg and leg global components.

I’m not gonna lie, I’m actually quite happy with how it turned out.

Refactoring, in programming, is often done poorly and when people say “I have to refactor this for the future” they often mean “I’ll rewrite it according to my understanding of the problem space and destroy every interface in the process”.

We remained strict about it instead, moved a bunch of functionality across components and suppressed some unnecessary parts of the graph, both across and inside components, with the public interfaces left entirely unscathed.
The fact it was done methodically and entirely by just reasoning about the graph’s topology and our expectations is the part that I believe was successful. Worth a watch, even if I say so myself.

Enjoy,